BERLIN: Win 1×2 Tickets for Múm plays Menschen am Sonntag @ Radialsystem V

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We all know that Berlin is a city which never sleeps, but we do need a break every once in a while, and get away from the madness, so why not go to a movie instead?

The globally celebrated band Múm plays a live score to a masterpiece of silent film. After their celebrated performances in the last two years, the Icelanders return to the stage of UM:LAUT right in time for Berlinale. Together with the percussionist Samuli Kosminen, the founding members of múm, Gunnar Örn Tynes and Örvar Smárason, perform live music to the wonderful classic movie “Menschen am Sonntag” – a timeless and vivid portrait of Berlin and its young inhabitants by the end of the 1920s.

FACEBOOK EVENT

TICKETS

Get the chance to win 1×2 tickets for Múm plays Menschen am Sonntag @ Radialsystem V on February 18th, by sending us a short mail with your name + name of the event to win@localsuicide.com. We’ll contact the winners!

MÚM & SAMULI KOSMINEN

With their numerous albums and diverse projects crossing the boundaries of various musical genres, the globally celebrated band múm has never fit into prevalent categories. The band was founded by Gunnar Örn Tynes and Örvar Smárason in 1997, later joined by twin sisters Kristín Anna and Gyda Valtýsdóttir. Their original and unique sound as well as the playful experimentation with traditional, electronic and unconventional instruments has quickly turned the band into one of the most popular acts from far North. During the last years the former quartet from Reykjavík has merged into an open collective exploring the boundaries of experimental listening experiences with various musician friends and in unpredictably changing lineups.

MENSCHEN AM SONNTAG

Menschen am Sonntag (People on Sunday) is regarded as one of „the outstanding works of the German silent film avantgarde“ (The International Encyclopedia of Film). In a semi-documentary manner, the film depicts the lives of young people in the metropolis of Berlin by the end of the 1920s. Although the film falls into the final stage of the great era of German silent cinema, it is neither nostalgic nor old-fashioned, but – with its unconventional and surprising images of people, locations and atmospheres, which are captured in a documentary style – it appears more like a protest against the beaten tracks of the old narrative cinema.

An event by UM:LAUT at Radialsystem V. With kind support by the Embassy of Iceland and the Finnish Music Foundation.